Tag Archives: design education

Art of Change (by Ken Baynes)

Over the past few months we have been getting Eileen Adams’ new book ready for publication in June. Called Eileen Adams: Agent of Change it is a ‘critical autobiography’ covering her experiences as a classroom teacher, researcher and campaigner. A recurring theme in her career is the use of study methods deriving from art to […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 1 )

A Fork in the Road (by Eddie Norman)

When I became Editor of Design and Technology Education: an international Journal (DATE:IJ) in 2005 there was a clear direction ahead. It had been set many years previously by the late Professor John Eggleston at the first IDATER conference in 1988. It was actually DATER then (Design and Technology Education Research and Curriculum Development Conference), […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 1 )

Window of Opportunity (by Ken Baynes)

Back cover

It seems very clear that something is seriously amiss in what might be called ‘cultural’ education. We have already reviewed the manifestos from NSEAD and the Crafts Council. Now we have a substantial report on the wider value of culture and the importance of cultural education. It comes from the Warwick Commission set up by […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )

Perfect Misfits and Webinars

In December Ken Baynes and Eddie Norman were invited to speak (via Skype) at the Principals Meet that is held annually at DSK International Campus, Pune in India to discuss the importance of creative careers in the 21st Century. The topic for discussion was ‘The Perfect Misfits’, so clearly irresistible to us. Mr. Ninad Panse […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 1 )

Better Together? (by Ken Baynes)

Much progress has been made since the astonishing Draft Proposals for Design and Technology in the English National Curriculum were published in 2013 and LDP responded by rapidly publishing Design Education: A Vision for the Future with the help of many of our friends. In the last few weeks, we have been reading two documents […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )

Gill Hope reviews ‘Graphicacy and Culture: Refocusing on visual learning’

Design and Technology Education: an international Journal, 19(3),  October 2014, pp.73-74 I was delighted to be asked to review Xenia Denos’ book, based as it is on the literature review of her Ph.D. thesis for which I was external examiner. In turn, I was honoured to be asked to perform this role, as I had followed […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )

Andrew Mutter reviews ‘Design: Models of Change’

AD, The National Society for Education in Art and Design magazine, Summer 2014, Issue 10, p.27             This book contains a wide range of thoughts about the impact of designerly thinking on people’s lives and the environment. Many of the chapters focus on the development of mental models and their […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )

An Iterative Model of Designing

If you have an interest in design education, then you’re likely to have already read the Department for Education’s Design and Technology Draft GCSE Subject Consultations. Responses are due by 20 November.  I read through the document and was initially left feeling quite comfortable, rather unchallenged, in fact I thought I quite liked it in […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 2 )

Published – Graphicacy and Culture: Refocusing on Visual Learning

graphicacy-culture-xenia-danos

Literacy, Numeracy and Graphicacy … We are delighted to announce the publication of Xenia Danos’ new book, which contributes to the creation of a platform for education in the area of graphicacy and refocusing on visual learning. As Xenia states at the beginning of her book: Just like literacy and numeracy, graphicacy is a vital […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )

Peter Gregory reviews ‘Design Education: a Vision for the Future’

DEVF review (AD)

Here is a good example of a responsive publication.  It grew from a lecture originally given in 2010 by Ken Baynes and is developed as a collection of essays using the same ‘seven key themes around which a future vision of design education could be framed’.  In part it celebrates what had already been identified […]

Continue Reading Comments ( 0 )