Tag Archives: Ken Baynes

An Iterative Model of Designing

If you have an interest in design education, then you’re likely to have already read the Department for Education’s Design and Technology Draft GCSE Subject Consultations. Responses are due by 20 November.  I read through the document and was initially left feeling quite comfortable, rather unchallenged, in fact I thought I quite liked it in […]

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‘Not in Plain Covers’ by Ken Baynes

I suppose book covers are considered a minor area of design and illustration. Minor but memorable. The first I remember was wrapped round The Wonder Book of Railways. It showed the driver’s view along the boiler of a Southern Railway locomotive. Memorable because at ten years old that was exactly where I wanted to be! […]

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Thinking through Drawing

  Thinking through Drawing 2012 was an interdisciplinary symposium on drawing, cognition and education held at the Wimbledon College of Art from 12-14 September 2012.  It focused on ‘Drawing in STEAM’ as this quotation from the organisers indicates. ‘How is drawing used within and between STEM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths)? What is the relationship […]

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Peter Gregory reviews ‘Design Education: a Vision for the Future’

DEVF review (AD)

Here is a good example of a responsive publication.  It grew from a lecture originally given in 2010 by Ken Baynes and is developed as a collection of essays using the same ‘seven key themes around which a future vision of design education could be framed’.  In part it celebrates what had already been identified […]

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John McCardle reviews ‘Design: Models of Change’

Design and Technology Education: An international Journal, 19(2),  June 2014, p.52 It’s not often I get the opportunity, let alone the inclination, to delve into a book and read it cover to cover. There are some books however that pull you in and refuse to let go. I am pleased that Ken Baynes’ latest publication, […]

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Interaction and LDP’s Website: Childhood Memories

KEN BAYNES,  AUTHOR OF DESIGN: MODELS OF CHANGE,  DISCUSSES SOME EARLY RESPONSES TO HIS INVITATION Faraway is near at hand with images of elsewhere  In the 1980s this gnomic graffiti used to greet travellers coming in to Paddington station from the west. As a message about the vividness of visual modelling in our lives it needed a […]

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Taking Tea at The National Gallery

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On the 9 November Loughborough Design Press (LDP) set out its stall at the Time for Tea! Conference at the National Gallery. We were delighted to have been invited to take part in this national conference to explore ‘drawing as thinking, expression and action’ (TEA). The importance of drawing and, perhaps even more broadly, mark-making is central […]

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David Spendlove reviews ‘Design Education: a Vision for the Future’

  The last few years have been a very difficult period for those involved in the Design and Technology education community. A change of government and a change of emphasis saw Design and Technology potentially marginalised in favour of a back to basics ‘analogue curriculum in a digital age’. Creativity, Technology and ‘Designerly Thinking’ were […]

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LDP Book Posters Available For Download

Design Education Squib Poster

Overview of the posters available to freely download from the Loughborough Design Press website for 3 of the latest books published by LDP. This includes the squib ‘Design Education: A Vision for the Future’.

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Frank Hills reviews ‘Design: Models of Change’

  An Eye Opener … Before reading this book, for me design was simply the planning process before making things. Ken Baynes sees it as something much broader and by studying his book I feel a serious gap has been revealed in my education. Ken Baynes has a very clear direct style of writing with […]

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